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Speed on the Gulf

Drunk Driving: One of the Leading Causes of Car Accidents in America

While data shows a significant decline in incidents over the last recent years, car accidents remain a prevailing problem all over America. The fact that driving involves some risks to one’s health and safety cannot be ignored. Given certain factors, a minor incident can easily turn into a car accident that entails several devastating consequences. The website www.pohlberkattorneys.com emphasizes this point by noting that car accidents remain to be among the most common reasons behind injuries and deaths reported annually across the nation.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety or NHTSA, one of the leading causes of such dangerous incidents is the prevalence of alcohol-impaired driving. Alcoholic drinks can significantly affect an individual in many ways, compromising his or her ability to operate a vehicle safely. Based on the data gathered by the NHTSA, drunk driving has led to over 10,000 fatalities for the year 2012 alone. These tragedies are a direct result of the myriad of ways that alcohol impedes one’s driving.

Data from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention makes this assertion clear, by breaking down the numbers regarding how different levels of blood alcohol concentration or BAC affect a person’s ability to drive. At 0.02 percent or about 2 alcoholic drinks, a driver can expect a decline on his or her visual functions, as well as the ability to perform two tasks at the same time. At 0.05 percent or roughly around 3 drinks, the effects of alcohol worsen, reducing a driver’s coordination and response to emergency situations.

It’s important to point out that these noted effects of alcohol are observed from individuals with BAC levels that are still below the legal limit. For private individuals, the legal BAC limit is at 0.08 percent. With that much alcohol in one’s system, a driver will experience loss of coordination, short-term memory, speech control, as well as impaired perception and reduced ability to process information.

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