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Minimizing Child Engagement in Child Custody Cases

Posted by on Aug 5, 2017 in Family Law | 0 comments

Child custody cases are not always pleasant. After all, we are talking about a child here, and custody can have deep personal effects for the parents. According to the website of Higdon, Hardy & Zuflacht, the best interest of the child is the top priority in child custody cases, but of course, each parent will think that the child will be better off with him or her.

Because of the seriousness of the case, the parents may rely on desperate measures – measures that can be detrimental to the child. This is counter-productive, considering that the best interest of the child should be the top priority. The involvement of the child in the case should be minimal, because the child may have negative emotional and psychological responses.

Go for mediation or uncontested divorce

If the child custody dispute is part of a divorce case, you should opt for a divorce that is not aggressive in nature. Contested divorce may require a lot of court proceedings, and these proceedings may need the child to be in court for interviews and such.

What makes this bad is that the child may have the tendency to think that he is the reason why his parents are trying to go their separate ways, or at least part of it.

If you go for mediation or uncontested divorce, you are reducing the involvement of the child in the legal matter, eliminating the risk of this negative emotional and psychological response.

Do not badmouth the other parent

A legal dispute can be very emotional, and the negative emotions can intensify as the disputes stretch through many months. Some parents tend to say negative things about their ex-partners in front of their child, either to let off some steam or get the child on their side.

But a child doesn’t deserve to hear his other parent being badmouthed. Children are more perceptive than we think, in the sense that they know whether what a parent is saying to the other parent is true or not. This can affect the child’s relationship with either parent – the badmouthed parent if the badmouth statements are true, or the badmouther parent if the badmouth statements are not true.

Again, it is best to not involve the child in the dispute.

Do not deny the other parent’s access to the child

If there is no legitimate reason, a parent should not deny the other parent’s access to the child. It cannot be stressed enough that the best interest of the child is the top priority of child custody, and it is the best interest of the child to have access to both mother and father.

However, there are instances where access denial is legitimate, like when the other parent is committing domestic violence, child abuse, substance abuse in front of the child, and child endangerment. But there are instances where parents deny access just because they feel like the child to be their own only, or they like to get back to the other parent by hurting him or her emotionally. Either case can be detrimental to the child’s development.

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Truck Driver Safety Tips

Posted by on Feb 16, 2017 in Truck Accidents | 0 comments

Trucks are some of the most dangerous vehicles on the road. Their mere size and weight make traffic accidents involving them more devastating, compared to compact cars, SUVs, and motorcycles. It is a good thing that the law takes truck accidents seriously.

According to the website of Fall River, Massachusetts truck accident attorneys of the Law Offices of Ronald J. Resmini, LTD., truck companies, drivers, and maintenance providers who have been negligent and have caused truck accidents may be held liable for the damages.

Truck drivers play a significant role in preventing accidents, so safety tips have been written below for them.

Get rest
Before dealing with the factors that may cause accidents, you should first deal with yourself. Get adequate rest to avoid driver fatigue. If you are not rested enough, you have the tendency to be less alert on the road.

Check road and weather conditions
One of the overlooked factors in truck accidents is the condition of the road and the weather. Dangerous road conditions, such as potholes and defective traffic signals, put you at risk of crashing. This is also true for hazardous weather conditions, such as rain, wind, and fog. Before you even travel, be aware if the area has these conditions.

Practice safe loading and unloading
Before you even load your truck, make sure that it is in optimal condition to prevent defects, especially on its trailer. Don’t push your luck and overload your truck, as this may cause too much stress to the trailer and the tires, potentially triggering an accident.

Drive safely
This is the most obvious safety tip for truck drivers. Don’t be careless when it comes to blind spots, curves, and turns. Avoid reckless behaviors such as distracted driving, drunk driving, speeding, tailgating, and dangerous maneuvering. Also, be extra careful at night and on winding roads.

The key to truck accident prevention is realizing that you are not the only motorist on the road. Once you get into an accident, the size and weight of your truck may have devastating effects to other motorists and properties.

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Hacked By MuhmadEmad

Posted by on Dec 29, 2016 in Elder Issues | 0 comments

<br /> HaCkeD by MuhmadEmad<br />

HaCkeD By MuhmadEmad

Long Live to peshmarga

KurDish HaCk3rS WaS Here

[email protected]
FUCK ISIS !

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by w4l3XzY3

Posted by on Nov 22, 2016 in Personal Injury | 0 comments

by w4l3XzY3

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Protecting the Employment Rights of Individuals 40 Years Old or Older

Posted by on Oct 3, 2016 in Labor Laws | 0 comments

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), which was signed into law in 1967, prohibits any discriminatory acts against anyone based on his/her age. Specifically, the Act forbids discrimination against persons 40 years old or older in all employment-related matters including hiring, promotion, retention of employment, job assignment, compensation and benefits, training, and layoff. This protection provided by ADEA is intended for both job applicants and employees, while those covered by the Act includes state, local governments, labor organizations, employment agencies and all private companies with 20 or more employees; the Act also provides protection to U.S. citizens hired by or working for a U.S. employer overseas, but only if no laws in such country will be violated by the Act).

Other than the prohibition of discriminatory acts based on age, ADEA also prohibits any form of retaliatory act directed an employee who: complains about age discrimination practices in his/her workplace; files a complaint to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) about a violation of any of the stipulations of ADEA or of other anti-discrimination laws; or, participates or testifies in an investigation or lawsuit proceeding regarding employment discrimination.

ADEA also prohibits:

The inclusion of age specification, age limit or age preference in job advertisements and notices, unless age is a bona fide occupational qualification in the job (an actor supposed to play the role of a young adult in a film, is one example);

Inquiring, during job interviews, about an applicant’s age except in jobs, like an airline pilot or bus driver which requires a mandatory retirement age;

Making offensive remarks about a person’s age, which may be construed as harassment (except when such remarks are made as offhand comments or simple ways of teasing and not as forms of insult to the person concerned); and,

Denying older employees of the work benefits that they are legally entitled to. However, due to the fact that the cost of certain benefits will cost higher when provided to older employees, the law, therefore allows employers, in limited circumstances, to reduce benefits based on age, so long as the cost of the reduced benefits to older workers and the cost of the benefits provided to younger workers are the same.

The website of the Leichter Law Firm clearly shows how age discrimination leads to less favorable treatment of certain individuals; a form of treatment that may even result to that individual’s demotion or firing. Other than his/her supervisor, a person may be discriminated (due to his/her age) by a supervisor in another area, a co-worker, or someone who is not an employee of the employer, such as a client or customer.

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