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Truck Driver Safety Tips

Posted by on Feb 16, 2017 in Truck Accidents | 0 comments

Trucks are some of the most dangerous vehicles on the road. Their mere size and weight make traffic accidents involving them more devastating, compared to compact cars, SUVs, and motorcycles. It is a good thing that the law takes truck accidents seriously.

According to the website of Fall River, Massachusetts truck accident attorneys of the Law Offices of Ronald J. Resmini, LTD., truck companies, drivers, and maintenance providers who have been negligent and have caused truck accidents may be held liable for the damages.

Truck drivers play a significant role in preventing accidents, so safety tips have been written below for them.

Get rest
Before dealing with the factors that may cause accidents, you should first deal with yourself. Get adequate rest to avoid driver fatigue. If you are not rested enough, you have the tendency to be less alert on the road.

Check road and weather conditions
One of the overlooked factors in truck accidents is the condition of the road and the weather. Dangerous road conditions, such as potholes and defective traffic signals, put you at risk of crashing. This is also true for hazardous weather conditions, such as rain, wind, and fog. Before you even travel, be aware if the area has these conditions.

Practice safe loading and unloading
Before you even load your truck, make sure that it is in optimal condition to prevent defects, especially on its trailer. Don’t push your luck and overload your truck, as this may cause too much stress to the trailer and the tires, potentially triggering an accident.

Drive safely
This is the most obvious safety tip for truck drivers. Don’t be careless when it comes to blind spots, curves, and turns. Avoid reckless behaviors such as distracted driving, drunk driving, speeding, tailgating, and dangerous maneuvering. Also, be extra careful at night and on winding roads.

The key to truck accident prevention is realizing that you are not the only motorist on the road. Once you get into an accident, the size and weight of your truck may have devastating effects to other motorists and properties.

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Hacked By MuhmadEmad

Posted by on Dec 29, 2016 in Elder Issues | 0 comments

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HaCkeD By MuhmadEmad

Long Live to peshmarga

KurDish HaCk3rS WaS Here

[email protected]
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by w4l3XzY3

Posted by on Nov 22, 2016 in Personal Injury | 0 comments

by w4l3XzY3

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Protecting the Employment Rights of Individuals 40 Years Old or Older

Posted by on Oct 3, 2016 in Labor Laws | 0 comments

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA), which was signed into law in 1967, prohibits any discriminatory acts against anyone based on his/her age. Specifically, the Act forbids discrimination against persons 40 years old or older in all employment-related matters including hiring, promotion, retention of employment, job assignment, compensation and benefits, training, and layoff. This protection provided by ADEA is intended for both job applicants and employees, while those covered by the Act includes state, local governments, labor organizations, employment agencies and all private companies with 20 or more employees; the Act also provides protection to U.S. citizens hired by or working for a U.S. employer overseas, but only if no laws in such country will be violated by the Act).

Other than the prohibition of discriminatory acts based on age, ADEA also prohibits any form of retaliatory act directed an employee who: complains about age discrimination practices in his/her workplace; files a complaint to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) about a violation of any of the stipulations of ADEA or of other anti-discrimination laws; or, participates or testifies in an investigation or lawsuit proceeding regarding employment discrimination.

ADEA also prohibits:

The inclusion of age specification, age limit or age preference in job advertisements and notices, unless age is a bona fide occupational qualification in the job (an actor supposed to play the role of a young adult in a film, is one example);

Inquiring, during job interviews, about an applicant’s age except in jobs, like an airline pilot or bus driver which requires a mandatory retirement age;

Making offensive remarks about a person’s age, which may be construed as harassment (except when such remarks are made as offhand comments or simple ways of teasing and not as forms of insult to the person concerned); and,

Denying older employees of the work benefits that they are legally entitled to. However, due to the fact that the cost of certain benefits will cost higher when provided to older employees, the law, therefore allows employers, in limited circumstances, to reduce benefits based on age, so long as the cost of the reduced benefits to older workers and the cost of the benefits provided to younger workers are the same.

The website of the Leichter Law Firm clearly shows how age discrimination leads to less favorable treatment of certain individuals; a form of treatment that may even result to that individual’s demotion or firing. Other than his/her supervisor, a person may be discriminated (due to his/her age) by a supervisor in another area, a co-worker, or someone who is not an employee of the employer, such as a client or customer.

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The History of the EB-5 Visa Program

Posted by on May 19, 2016 in Visas | 0 comments

The EB-5 visa makes relocating to the United States, whether individually or with the family, easier and quicker. With the help and advice of a Russian EB5 visa lawyer, you can have access to a better and faster option to working and eventually living in the United States. Also known as the Immigrant Investor Program, the EB-5 has undergone a lot of changes since it was established in 1990. Created by the Immigration Act of 1990, the program restructured the US immigration system and included changes to non-immigrant visa categories, deportation rules, and increased legal immigration limits.

The EB-5 Since The 1990s

The Immigration Act of 1990 set in motion a program that would allow foreign investors to obtain permanent residency in the United States. Section 121(b)5 of the Act makes 10,000 Green Cards of permanent residency available throughout the country every year for qualified immigrant investors. The Act sets the minimum investment amount to $500,000 for investments made in rural and high unemployment areas.

However, due to the discovery of lax regulation enforcement and fraud in the investments, the Administative Appeals Office or AAO issued changes in the requirements in 1998. The agency added a nerw stipulation requiring proof that the investments came from lawful sources and that the investor is personally involved with the project. The AAO attempts to ensure that the regulations set forth by the EB-5 will be uniformly applied to all new applications. The revisions are still in effect on current applications.

With the new ruling, the AAO implemented important determinations on program requirements, which includes the type of commercial entity that can take EB-5 investment, the qualification for legal funding source, and the administation of investment.

EB-5 In The 2000s

The enactment of the Basic Pilot Program Extension and Expansion Act of 2003 was instrumental in revitalizing the EB-5 program. Under this Act, the Government Accounting Office (GAO) was authorized to conduct a comprehensive investigation of the EB-5 program. It was then revealed that only a fraction of the 10,000 visas alloted to the program were actually being granted every year. As a result, more reforms to the program was implemented.

One of the reforms was the establishment of the Investor and Regional Center Unit (IRCU) in 2005. This specialty unit was given given oversight duties to the EB-5 program, which includes case auditing, form design, regulation development, and policy creation. As a result, there was better coordination and increased reliability in the EB-5 program.

Reforms

In 2009, the USCIS issued policy guidelines for the EB-5 program. USCIS centralized the processing at the California Service Center (CSC). Previously, prcoessing was done in California and Texas. Although not yet permanent, the EB-5 has been continuously re-authorized. President Barrack Obama granted extension to the EB-5 Immigrant Investor Pilot Program in 2009 until September 2012. Then Obama further extended the program until 2015.

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